Elephant #43 – A World Apart

£12.00

In this issue we meet five artists who visualize the way in which humans interact, and the chasms that exist between us. Kambui Olujimi addresses the intentional muting of Black joy, creating moments of boundless possibility in his potent works. Todd Hido captures the cold division of suburban neighbours who live behind picket fences. Conversely, Sarah Slappey paints wild conglomerations of human bodies. GaHee Park explores the strange pleasures of close domestic proximity, and Rafal Milach questions how people keep on functioning under oppressive regimes.

In stock

SKU: E043 Category:

Description

In this issue we meet five artists who visualize the way in which humans interact, and the chasms that exist between us. Kambui Olujimi addresses the intentional muting of Black joy, creating moments of boundless possibility in his potent works. Todd Hido captures the cold division of suburban neighbours who live behind picket fences. Conversely, Sarah Slappey paints wild conglomerations of human bodies. GaHee Park explores the strange pleasures of close domestic proximity, and Rafal Milach questions how people keep on functioning under oppressive regimes.

In our Encounters interviews, Tschabalala Self talks about the importance of representation in visual art; Bosco Sodi tells us about the impact that Abstract Expressionism has made on his deep, earthy works; we hear from Joana Vasconcelos about nationalism, and the unexpected connections that bind countries and individuals together; Lindsay Seers speaks about breaking down the binary understanding of fact and fiction; and John Kørner ponders authenticity and the connecting energy of public sport.

We explore lockdown creativity in our Paper Galleries, sharing the photographic project of New York couple David Brandon Geeting and Lina Sun Park, created entirely within the four walls of their apartment. And we feature the dynamic works of Shara Hughes, which draw their viewer into fantastical landscape scenes which seem to pulse with colour.

We also learn about the creative history of London squats, from the people who knew them best. The likes of Jimmy Cauty and David Shillinglaw discuss how these spaces were once fertile ground for art, music, activism and community, and consider the uncertain future that lies ahead.

Additional information

Weight 0.6 kg
Dimensions 21 × 29 × 1.5 cm

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “Elephant #43 – A World Apart”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *